About

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I've been mucking around in the intersection of politics and technology for nearly twenty years.   During my undergrad in 2001 I helped Prof. Ron Diebert found the Citizen Lab, at the University of Toronto.  Working and studying there until 2005 was fascinating, rewarding and challenging, and it's since become the world's foremost center on Internet censorship and surveillance.   I worked on two TV documentary projects during that time and for a hot minute was recongizable to the devoted watchers of late night Canadian provincial public broadcasters.

After U of T, I spent a delightful time being irresponsible in Australia, before returning to Toronto to work on a variety of eHealth related projects for the provincial Ministry of Health. 

graemeforsenate
This is meant to be a bit silly

Since 2011 I've been working for Tucows, the worlds second largest domain registrar, most recently as Head of Policy.  This has primarily meant engaging in ICANN and related internet governance activities, and at this point I've attended 22 ICANN meetings.  From 2016 through June 2020 I was the elected chair of the Registrar Stakeholder Group, a structure that represents ICANN accredited domain registrars, whose membership comprimises some 90% of the domains on the internet.  My tenure has seen tremendous change within ICANN and internet governance, and I've shepherded my organization through the IANA transition, which effectively means the Internet now governs itself, as well as through the extremely tumultuous impact of the European GDPR on domain registration.

I've also served for two terms on the board of the Internet Infrastructure Coalition, providing guidance and insight on issues of internet governance and the politics of the domain registration industry.

I'm also a frequent participant and contributor to the Internet and Jurisdiction Project, as well as the ICANN Studienkreis.

When not working I like hanging out with my partner and my dog in Toronto, riding bikes as much as possible, and taking photographs.

 

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